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If you don’t observe the religious significance of Easter, what remains for us in the Southern Hemisphere?

I’ve written on a number of occasions about the incongruity of Christmas in the hot Australian summer, but never about what Easter is like here. It is autumn, the harvest (or vintage!) is finally in, the leaves are turning, the evenings are drawing in and turning cool… and it is Easter. If you don’t observe the religious significance of Easter, what remains for us in the Southern Hemisphere? Gone also is the  symbolism of the spring and new life: lambing, blossoms, the passing of winter, hope… and the Easter bunny is a non-native pest introduced by the colonists for sport, hardly a creature to be celebrated.

Of course, we have chocolate eggs and the fun of an egg hunt. Family gatherings will be like Christmas but without the stress and hype, with a bit less commercialism. Camping is also hugely popular as the extra long weekend offers a last chance to fully experience the great outdoors, unless you are the intrepid hard-core type. For others it is the lure of the ocean- sailing, fishing, or just a walk on the beach. We glimpsed a pod of dolphins at sunset on Easter Sunday, always a joyous surprise. It felt symbolic. That’ll do for me.

For the Daily Post weekly photo challenge Surprise.

See also:

Easter in Melbourne

Red hot Christmas

Ozmas

Two faces of Easter